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Otlet – International network and infrastructure for scientists to share, source and request biological samples

Madeline Green1, Lauren Meyer1, Lachlan Fetterplace1 & Tiffany Nay2 1Otlet, Sydney, NSW, Australia 2James Cook University, Townsville, Australia   Research teams collect >94 million biological samples annually, the majority of which are subsampled for analyses. The remaining sample, often including a number of unused organs, can be repurposed for additional studies by collaborators around the…

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Investigating physiological mechanisms and ecological consequences of a climate-driven range extension of a marine predator (Chrysophrys auratus) into southeast Tasmania

Mr Barrett Wolfe1, Dr Quinn Fitzgibbon1, Dr Jayson Semmens1, Dr Sean Tracey1, Dr Gretta Pecl1,2 1Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University Of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia, 2Centre for Marine Socioecology, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia The southeast Australian ocean warming hotspot has been host to a number of ongoing marine species redistributions, and thus has…

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Salt of the earth: a critical impediment to herbivore range-shifts in response to climate change

Dr Kara Youngentob1, Dr Karen Marsh1, Professor  William Foley1 1Australian National University, Canberra, Australia Sodium is essential to the survival of all mammals. It is the predominant cation circulating in the blood and it is necessary for many essential bodily functions, from osmotic homeostasis and nerve transmission, to reproduction and lactation. However, herbivores can struggle…

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The importance of understanding intraspecific behavioral variation in migratory fishes and its impact on the adaptability of these fishes to climate change

AC Winkler, AR Childs1, M Parkinson1, M Roberts, C Santos, Professor Warwick Sauer1, Professor Warren Potts1 1Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa, 2Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark Intraspecific behavioral variation is common throughout numerous animal taxa being referred to using a multitude of terms such as “partial migration” or the “contingent theory” in order…

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Migration in the cobia, and potential for adaptation to climate change

Dr Kevin Weng1, Mr Daniel Crear1, Mr Brian Watkins1, Dr Richard Brill1, Dr Alistair  Hobday2, DR Peter Bushnell3 1Virginia Institute Of Marine Science, Gloucester Point, Virginia 23062-1346, United States, 2CSIRO, Hobart, Australia, 3Indiana University South Bend, South Bend, United States In order to adapt to climate change a species can redistribute to maintain its preferred…

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Phenological shifts reshape expectations for distributional shifts in a montane avifauna

Dr Morgan Tingley1, Dr Jacob Socolar1, Dr Steven Beissinger2, Dr Peter Epanchin3 1University of Connecticut, Storrs, USA, 2University of California, Berkeley, USA, 3US Agency for International Development, Washington, USA Global change ecology predicts that, under a warming climate, consumers such as birds should shift their geographic distributions to track temperature and should adjust their breeding…

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Do microbes play a role in facilitating the range expansion of tropical fish into temperate systems?

A/Prof Adriana Verges1, Ines Richter1, Torsten Thomas1, Suhelen Egan1 1UNSW Sydney, Sydney, Australia The climate-mediated range expansion of tropical, herbivorous fish into temperate regions has profound impacts on temperate reefs, through overgrazing of habitat-forming seaweeds. The mechanisms that control such novel plant-herbivore interactions between tropical consumers and temperate seaweeds are largely unknown, but recent studies…

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How dragonflies and damselflies respond to global change; a cross-continental analysis

Ms Catherine Sirois-Delisle1, Dr. Jeremy Kerr1 1University Of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada There are critical gaps in understanding how and when species respond to rapid environmental change that limit our capacity to address conservation risks in a timely way. Odonates (dragonflies and damselflies) are excellent model organisms to explore this issue: their range margins are thought…

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Dog days are over? A mechanistic model for predicting the persistence of the African wild dog under climate change

Ms Daniella Rabaiotti1,2, Professor Rosie Woodroffe1, Professor Tim Coulson3, Professor  Richard  Pearson2 1Zoological Society of London, London, United Kingdom, 2University College London, London, United Kingdom, 3University of Oxford, Oxford, UK Predicting areas that will be climatically suitable for species in the future is key when predicting the impact of climate change on wildlife. Currently, most…

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The effect of habitat complexity on temperature preference in coral reef fish.

Ms Tiffany Nay1, Dr.  Andrew Hoey1, Dr. Jodie Rummer1, Prof. John Steffensen2, Dr. Jacob Johansen3 1ARC CoE Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, Australia, 2University of Copenhagen, Helsingør, Denmark, 3New York University-Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates Global temperatures are becoming more extreme, posing a challenge to ectothermic species. Many ectotherms utilize thermoregulation…